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Brian Brooks Moving Company at American Dance Festival (2012)

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2015/2016 Tour Dates

Fri & Sat, Aug, 28 & 29, 2015 Chicago Dancing Festival
Torrent, RETROGRADE
Chicago, IL
Fri & Sat, Apr, 29 & 30, 2016 ADI
New work
Rockville, MD

Please check back soon for newly announced tour dates!

Press

“The coiling fullness of Mr. Brooks’s choreography, brimming with detail, frequently mesmerizes”

– Siobhan Burke, New York Times
full article (PDF)

Brooks loves to shatter conventional notions of the human capacity for strength and endurance.”

– Susan Yung, Dance Magazine

“He shows us that what is simple can be miraculous…I think that is choreographic genius, really – making the next movement seem inevitable, revealing the virtuosity of the basics, and uncovering interesting stories in repetition.”

– Christine Jowers,The Dance Enthusiast
full article (PDF)

“Brian Brooks Moving Company is a perpetual motion machine…Yes to virtuosity with edge.”
repetition.”

– Eva Yaa Asantewaa, Infinite Body

More Press Quotes

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“The effect is of particle colliding and ricocheting within structural confines, and it’s an impressive demonstration of Mr. Brook’s ability to spin new combinations out of a single idea”

-Roslyn Sulcas,The New York Times

“Brian Brooks unleashed the tightly controlled chaos of his conceptual choreographic style.”

– Manuel Mendoza, The Dallas Morning News
full article (PDF)

“When an invisible current is not pulling the dancers in Brian Brooks Moving Company, the dancers are hauling one another like planks, carving out space with boards, or, in one memorable solo, repeatedly slapping stiff arms in a paroxysm of fury. But that hardly covers what transpired… There was something simple and compelling about just about every one of the five works.”

– Margaret Putnam, Theater Jones
full article (PDF)

“Brooks’s brilliant escalating repetitions call for endurance, not to say heroism, on the part of the performers… Smart, utterly unpretentious heroes, they make your eyes water and your spirit soar.'”

– Deborah Jowitt,The Village Voice
full article (PDF)

“Brian Brooks’s choreography is a kind of external exploration of human limits.”

– Susan Yung, Dance Magazine
full article (PDF)

“Brian Brooks Moving Company’s performance of again again conjures an otherworldly place through both clever movement choices and mysterious visuals.”

– Nancy Wozny, Dance Source Houston
full article (PDF)

“If a movement is worth doing, it’s worth doing again.”

– Deborah Jowitt, The Village Voice

“Brian Brooks unleashed the tightly controlled chaos of his conceptual choreographic style.”

– Manuel Mendoza, The Dallas Morning News
full article (PDF)

“Every inch of [Brooks’] body is electrified, yet he’s in total control—a perfect metaphor for his choreography.”

– Tresca Weinstein, Times Union
full article (PDF)

“When an invisible current is not pulling the dancers in Brian Brooks Moving Company, the dancers are hauling one another like planks, carving out space with boards, or, in one memorable solo, repeatedly slapping stiff arms in a paroxysm of fury. But that hardly covers what transpired… There was something simple and compelling about just about every one of the five works.”

– Margaret Putnam, Theater Jones
full article (PDF)

Repertory

Torrent (2014) is a joyous complexity of rigorous dance phrases ricocheting off one another. A full company work for 8 dancers, it is 16 minutes in length and set to Max Richter’s reimagined score of Vivaldi’s Four Seasons. Renowned dancer Wendy Whelan suggested the Brooks consider choreographing to this music while they were in rehearsal for her Restless Creature project in spring, 2013. Brooks originally created this dance for 24 Juilliard students when it premiered in December, 2013. His company performed it along with 18 Juilliard students at Fall for Dance at City Center in October, 2014. Brooks restaged the work on his company of 8 dancers, who then performed it at the Guggenheim on Oct 19&20, 2014 in its Works & Process programming.

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Division (2014) is a dance for 6 dancers and 6 boards, 16 minutes in length and is set to a commissioned score by Jerome Begin. Division was created during Brooks’ Joyce Theater year-long residency which gave him the time to research and development his ideas making use of the boards and examining the edges of spaces through movement. In Division, Brooks is interested in how movement can retract; how a dance phrase can wind and unwind, spiral and unspiral. He’s looking at the interruption of propulsion and the disturbance of flow. The boards carve the space, expanding and contracting it. Division is a tour de force of movement density accompanied by Begin’s electronic score. Begin (Music Director of The Juilliard School Dance Division) used the technique of amplifying the boards and then auto-tuning, processing, and multi-tracking the resulting sound. Division was also presented at the Guggenheim on Oct 19&20, 2014 in its Works & Process programming.

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In Run Don’t Run (2013), Brooks employs rapid-fire partnering to explore the spatial contradictions of bodies in motion. Behind a blur of color—created by hundreds of cloth strands stretched across the stage, and despite constant effort to advance, eight dancers race into one another and are caught in a state of suspension when their motion is halted, redirected and confined by a shifting array of obstructions. Integrating a complex and vibrant set installation by Brooks and Phillip Treviňo with lighting design by Joe Levasseur, Run Don’t Runamplifies the actions of the human body, its limitations and resilience.

DESCENT is a full-company work that explores the relationships between bodies and their paradoxical tendency to exhibit both dependency and detachment. Performed against a liquid black backdrop flecked with thin splinters and dapples of light, “DESCENT” is absorbing, meditative, and “visually arresting.” (NY Times)

Brian Brooks explores the body’s use of force within articulated spaces, both in relation to one’s surroundings and within the relative space defined by one’s own body. He juxtaposes the tension of working within confined spaces against the relief of breaking out of them, carefully navigating the balance and transition between the two. Informed by formal dance techniques, physical sports, parkour, street dance, and physics, Brooks’s movement is somewhat of a hybrid, splicing together an array of influences intended to be both fluid and contradictory. The piece’s 9-minutes of precision and thrashing are emphasized by the music’s pounding beat and recurring spoken lyric, “I’m losing my edge.” Brooks questions the confines of the gray suit he wears, and perhaps the pressures that accompany it.

Spanning the distance from the back of the stage out to the farthest walls of the theater, hundreds of sky blue cables expand to create a tunnel-like space over both audience and performers in the 40-minute dance MOTOR (2010). Within this vibrant, large-scale installation, dancers wrestle with themselves and one another in sequences that amplify our linear perception of time and experience. Structuring informal movement in a formal way, choreographer Brian Brooks builds each moment off the previous one, creating a chain reaction that continues until the show’s end.

BIG CITY (2012), celebrates the human effort inherent in the process of rebuilding. BIG CITY boasts a large-scale, kinetic sculpture constructed with hundreds of aluminum columns, showcasing Brooks’s affinity for architectural design. This dynamic floor-to-ceiling installation is raised in real time before the audience’s eyes, memorializing the inevitable reconstruction that follows loss. Performed by the company’s seven dancers, Brooks’s choreography hovers between balance and imbalance, testing limits of physical and emotional endurance. BIG CITY features an original score by composer Jonathan Pratt, costumes by long-time collaborator Roxana Ramseur, lighting by Philip Treviño and set by Brooks and Treviño.

Bios

The Brian Brooks Moving Company has been presented throughout the US, Asia and Europe since 2002. In its hometown of New York City, the group has been presented by organizations including Lincoln Center, Symphony Space, Central Park Summerstage and the 92nd Street Y Harkness Festival. National tours have included presentations by the American Dance Festival, Jacob’s Pillow, Vanderbilt University, Davidson College, the Egg and Wesleyan University. Additional support has come in the form of creative residencies awarded by 3-Legged Race in Minneapolis, SUMMERDANCE Santa Barbara, the University of Maryland, Colorado’s Green Box Festival and the Mt. Tremper Arts Festival. Dance Theater Workshop has commissioned and presented two premieres: 2004’s ACRE and 2006’s again again. Alfred University has presented the company on three occasions, as well as providing a residency that led to the creation of Brooks’s first self-made video dance, RAPID STILL, which has been licensed to Lincoln Center Institute for study by international educators.

New York-based choreographer Brian Brooks was recently awarded a 2013 Guggenheim Fellowship. He is a recipient of the NY City Center Fellowship (2012-2013), the Jerome Robbins New Essential Works Grant (2013) and the National Dance Project’s Production and Residency Grants (2012). His dance group, the Brian Brooks Moving Company, has toured internationally since 2002 and enjoyed two consecutive seasons at the Joyce Theater (2011, 2012) in addition to being presented as part of the Focus Dance program in January 2013.

National touring has been generously supported with repeat engagements at Jacob’s Pillow, Becket, MA (04, 13); the Chicago Dancing Festival, Chicago, IL (11, 12, 13); the American Dance Institute, Rockville, MD (12, 13); the American Dance Festival, Durham, NC (05, 12); Wesleyan University’s Center for the Arts, Middletown, CT (02, 07, 09, 12); SUMMERDANCE Santa Barbara/DANCEworks (04, 05, 06, 12); The Egg, Albany, NY (05, 13); North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (09, 11); and Alfred University (04, 05, 10).

Brooks has recently been commissioned to create new works for The Juilliard School (2013) and the Vail international Dance Festival (2012, 2013), and is currently involved in a multi-year tour performing his duet with NY City Ballet Principal Dancer Wendy Whelan. In October 2013, his new piece, Run Don’t Run, will be presented by the Brooklyn Academy of Music as part of their Next Wave Festival.

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